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Full list of feature essays (179) most recent first
Arlene Goldbard - Essays about the arts, arts funding, and politics
Miguel Angel Nuñez - Escribe en Barinas, Caracas, y Mérida sobre Venezuela
Paul Rockwell - Series of essays on the war in Iraq, affirmative action, Martin Luther King, more
Devinder Sharma - New Delhi-based food and trade policy analyst
Triona Carey - Essays from Ireland (1996-1999)
Including the Northern Ireland Peace Process
Recent Letters
Feature Essays

"What a good president would do -- that would really help family farmers"
2 November 2011

I appreciated your coverage of how difficult it is for small and midsize livestock producers to turn a profit in a discriminatory marketplace that favors corporate giants. Today, Americans are concerned with job creation more than any other issue. As your article pointed out, hundreds of thousands of jobs have disappeared from rural communities because family farmers -- who should be the backbone of American agriculture -- can't stay afloat. President Obama must act on this issue.

But I'm not a small farmer, so why do I care? Why should anyone care? Because fair livestock marketing rules wouldn't only protect the profits of small livestock producers, they would also keep safe, healthy, and sustainable food options on the shelves for consumers. If you're concerned with antibiotic- and hormone-ridden meat, or the increasing instances of meat recalls by the likes of Cargill, then you realize that corporate factory farms are a real threat to public health. If you want to buy food produced locally, and not food that has been shipped over thousands of miles by a faceless corporation before it reaches your grocery store, then you want small farmers to stay in business. And the environmental impacts of factory farm operations are well documented.

Wouldn't it be great if you could by your meat from a neighbor? Shouldn't we all be able to say with certainly that the food we purchase is good for our bodies and was produced in a way that isn't harmful to the environment? We need fair livestock marketing rules. Specifically, the GIPSA rules, as your article mentioned. And we need them now, for the benefit of both small farmers and consumers.

Will Mathewson
Minneapolis, MN




Privatization of public schools
12 July 2011

What is the current philosophy of private, rather than, public run schools?(K-12),

I see one major benefit, seeing as many school systems absorb about 60%to 70% of the local budget plus additional funding from State & Federal sources. This would at least place all school property on the local tax rolls. I'm positive private business control of these properties & the responsibility of educating (rather than indoctrinating) our children. Competition creates the best of any endeavor, that includes education in any form. This would also reduce federal & state control of elementary education & put it back where it belongs - under local control.

Local control was where it all started, at least for the first 300 plus years.

Locals built the school house, hired a teacher, paid the salary & provided the necessary material and oversight. Guess what - it worked very well & resulted in the formation of the most productive, richest country this world has ever known. It wasn't broke but they screwed it up anyway.

Just a few frustated thoughts when I look at the expense & failed end product coming out of this over-regulated system called "No Child Left Behind", under the false slogan (It's For The Children".

Charles Checkley
Plymouth, MA



With this Faith
-- Ja Jahannes

23 January 2011

I was very moved by a poem I read on your website written by Ja Jahannes entitled "With this Faith". The melodious compelling words echoed to the spirit of my soul.  If everyone would live by the ideology the poem conveys, i.e. peace, love, and humanity; then perhaps our primordial living would be elevated to a place where we would not be enslaved by the conditions for which we have entrapped ourselves.  We are responsible to contribute to our universe and make it a better place for those that follow.  It is our duty to leave a legacy and an inheritance to the next generation. For me, this poem serves as a reminder as well as a blueprint for our survival. When I read this powerful piece, I was reminded of how important it is to be aware, awake and involved in this world we call home.  Dr. Ja Jahanne’s poem is timeless.  The poem evokes hope and faith for mankind to live an unbridled, unselfish life.  That mere existence should not be enough.  Thank you for publishing this insightful piece that speaks to the heart of life.  I can’t wait to see more of his works because it defiantly stirred my soul. 

Mae Thomas
Greenville, NC




With this Faith -- Ja Jahannes
16 January 2011

Thank you for publishing Ja Jahannes's libretto for With This Faith.

I have seen the production of this requiem for Martin Luther King Jr. here in Savannah in 2008 and 2009 and was tremendously touched both times.

I enjoyed this opportunity to read Jahannes's beautiful words and phrasing.


Andrea Silverman,
Savannah, Georgia



Response to Photo of the Week
The Presidio, San Francisco.
Photo by Leon Sun.

16 January 2011

Beautiful composition. Peaceful ... yet the light fog heightens awareness of uncertainty of what is beyond that which we see or know. Resonates with me on a very personal level which I think is quite universal.



In response to
Alice Lovelace's "Armed with Art"

8 November 2010

The speech and poetry you sent was very illuminating.

I found myself, reading words, which conveyed pictures within my mind.

Several times I stopped, looked up a word or two which enhanced the experience and moved me deeper still. It was a geographical education of life.....  
 
I am reading “The art of happiness" right now, and the Dali Lama words reinforce and match the inner force or voice which sustains me.

The teachings that do not move or motivate me, educate me about the art of loving, understanding and supporting those that follow a different path than my own.

In the beginning was deceptive. I blazed through my first reading and wondered what or why I felt incomplete. The second reading.... I separated each line.....as an individual one line poem, making the journey interesting and real……the third reading was without interruption, for it was done in the peacefulness of a long dark night…..and WOW….   The words floated from the page directly into my mind.

Bless the dew that falls each night  (I was still a child...ran outside....the touch of moisture between my toes... seeing chickens, goats, and smelling manure for the first time.)  Mama let me go the farm of a neighbor.... I had never known the touch of "worked" soil beneath my feet.


Bless art when it hurts or when it heals (I was 22, maybe 25 reading a magazine.  The artist's photo was of miles of cracked dry earth yielding no crops.  The people were starving, packed tight for miles waiting on United Nations rations.  I felt small, powerless, sad, and angry.....for I imagined myself a powerful being.  That same year the artist also published a photo of a young girl with bluish/greenish eyes...she was called the Afghan girl....  In my American arrogance I was sorry for her...thinking what a great life she could have if someone would do SOMETHING!  No one in the Pakistan refugee camp would do anything and of course the Russians who occupied Afghanistan were the evil empire... I was hurt and felt powerless) Art can cut deep.  From that point on, I don't remember there was ever a time I took anything printed, spoken or reported on face value ever again. (I was 40 maybe 45, when a photo of a woman surfaced she was the same woman who had been called "The Afghan Girl", the young girl with the green eyes, in photo published by National Geographic.  I had kept that magazine for more than 25 years.  I was elated that she was still alive... was a wife, a mother, knowing sorrow and great happiness.   Her wish was that her daughters would receive an education, which is something she never had.    It sounded so much like many people I know personally.    It felt healed in a small way... thinking about Claudia when she received her GED, and how it motivated her daughter Dominic to get her G.E.D.  I smiled... Art heals.  Mothers all over the world are not so different in their wishes for their children.
 
Thank you so much for sharing.
 

Michael L. Moore




The Beginning of an Old School Year
20 July 2008

I’m about to start a new school year and I should be excited about it: but I am not. I enjoy serving the children that I teach. Primarily, it is not them that subvert my enthusiasm. The United States, and indeed, the world seem to be in crisis. Whether it’s the mortgage, the global warming, health-care, gang-warfare crises, etc.: all of these problems seem to be related to the crisis in our educational systems.

I believe all children can learn extremely complex concepts, and phenomena: and I believe that they can apply such knowledge in novel ways. If taught, they can learn to think at higher levels of critical thought. The joy that escapes me in returning to teach is that I am not allowed to partake in any decisions or discussions of what or how I teach. Therefore, any discoveries I make in how to teach children to think critically go un-tested. My students don’t have a text-book they can take home and study. This perplexes me as well.

These three problems (lack of critical thinking, severing teacher input and the divorce of children from texts) seem to be the crux of an educational system hell bent on producing failure.

Historically, African-American students have been segregated. It has been noted by Jonathan Kozol and others that this segregation exists again today. I might add that in some educational system, not only are African-American children segregated but their teachers are segregated as well. There are very, very few African-American teachers in the school where I work. To me it is quite an odd arrangement as the student population appears to be predominately African-American. Not only is there very little diversity in the teaching staff, there is very little diversity in the teacher leaders. In addition to teachers opinions not being valued- very little input of how and what African-American teachers think and feel is imported into the school. It amazes me when I see and experience blatant racism from some teachers: and they then walk in and teach students of color. These teachers deserve academy awards for the performances they give in front of parents.

The student work that is displayed on the walls, are nowhere near the high quality of work that students are capable of producing. Low expectations seem to abound. To question such practices is tantamount to mutiny. Those in charge simply ignore such questions or label the person asking the question as a troublemaker. Administrators learn early on that it is not wise to question the leaders.

How students are characterized is amazing as well. Once, an administrator wanted to group students based on these characteristics: “Who lies, steals, cheats, is rejected by their peers, has behavior problems and low academic achievement.” Such characterizations make it very difficult for me to hold onto my food or even stomach the idea of sitting in meetings where such an administrator claims to care about the students.

It all seems to be a game-like everyone is coming to work to make sure that these African-American children are highly educated, but there seems to be some underlying feelings that these children are not capable of that. The evidence is in the conversations that I hear and in the work the students are taught to produce. I have asked to be transferred away from this school, but to no avail. None of the people in the administration building will hear my pleas either. I think they’re hopeful to lighten the load of bearing a teaching staff with another questioning African-American teacher. Perhaps none of the crises we face would be so pathogenic if we were able to teach children in such a way that they learned to think critically: if teachers and children could help to design the curriculum that is taught and if all children were offered a textbook as a basis for an equitable education. Crises are points in our world where we are given the opportunity to solve problems. As long as we maintain educational system s that are insistent on doing the opposite of what is necessary to produce a critical thinking workforce, these crises will fester and grow.

Kim Robinson



Factory Farm Animals
8 March 2008

Please help stop and make the public aware with the media of how all animals are mis-treated greatly across our own United States. We have to speak for the animals since they can not. There is no sense in the cruel animal abuse, pain and suffering all the time of all animals large or small, in raising, transporting and/or slaughter.

Thank you.
Concerned Citizen


Violence in Our Society
2 April 2008

I am constantly baffled by those who display shock and disbelief at the increased violence in our society. By now it has become obvious we are beginning to reap the results of decades of having children raised by day care centers and teachers with no interest or authorization to discipline or define right and wrong.

We keep children sheltered from failure, award them for just showing up and taught them by inaction that there are no consequences for bad behaviour.

It has become more important to be a friend to a child than a parent. We instilled in them "rights", a feeling of entitlement, relative values and the belief that all their needs are justified and should be met.

Congratulations to the academics, child psychologists, other free thinking politicians and social architects whose ideas have born fruit.
Al Scaher
Tonka Bay, MN


Essays from Ireland
1 Feb 2007

Truth, honest, justice, is what I see in Triona Carey.

Bob Espada

The Brief Life of an Educational Policy
6 Nov 2006

Some of the policymakers who devise legislative decisions affecting educational issues are former practitioners. These former practitioners, one time teachers, counselors, and administrators, are the most fit at developing laws pertinent to public education. In other words, the instructors who spent time in the classrooms-along with the advisors and principals who shaped the career paths of many a student-are the best at constructing educational policy. Those former educators are the ones more likely to create the most practical of federal policies in education. The policies that those policymakers create are the ones that evolve into being the most beneficial to both teacher and student. On the other hand, there are federal policies being passed that were not devised by former stakeholders of education, which result in weak assessment showings during a policy evaluation stage.

The evolution of a federal policy normally begins with the identification of a need. For instance, there is a current need in the public educational system that involves the proliferation of cell phones. Middle and high school students across the nation attend their public schools equipped with cell phones. It is as common an accessory as notebooks and pens. In some states, policymakers identified the existence of cell phones in the schools as a problem. Cell phones were thereby deemed a nuisance for teachers and a distraction in the classrooms. Policies to ban cell phones in schools were thus passed.

The next step in the process involves a review of the legislation. Cooper et al. (2004) explains that ìthe process of evaluation comes toward the end of the education policymaking process, and is always complex but should be logical enoughî (p.2). After the policy is passed and institutions have implemented the new law, there is a stage where the policy is assessed. This period of assessment is based on the success of the policy, and it concerns how its role in education has garnered either positive or negative reviews. In the case of the cell phone ban, there were some school districts that had to renege on the policy once the evaluation stage was completed. The reason was due to the large volume of parental complaints. It seems that parents were the most vocal of opponents to the policy. As a result, the policy was eradicated after a period of assessment.

Nonetheless, the policymakers who sought to ban cell phones in schools were obviously intent on creating a more conducive learning environment, one devoid of ringing phones and students with the ability to text message their peers during instructional time. Hence, the cell phone ban was a legislative attempt made by those who once worked in the classrooms, policymakers with an investment to education. Some argue that participating school systems and states should organize their own research efforts, to maximize participation and to give a sense of ownership for the process and the results of certain policies (Cooper et al., 2004, p.1).

Yardan W. Shabazz
Virginia Beach, Virginia

Misuse of terrorism
7 Sep 2006

Dear Editor:
It appears that when President Bush says, "U.S. safer but not yet safe," he means to begin scaring us again. When we talk about "security," we are actually making people question it. I am saddened that elections are now fear-based.

Terrorism being used for political ends by our own government against us is a kind of terrorism, and constitutes psychological abuse. It is time Americans become fully aware of this, and that as a society we reject this unethical and destructive manipulation.

Robert E. Griffin
Psychologist
Forty Fort, Pa.

Untouchability in India
7 Sep 2006

Unless there is pressure from outside, caste based hatredness and discrimination will continue in India. Untouchability which is still pervasive in the country, if thought seriously, is a gross violation of human rights. It is not that there is no effort from inside, but the protagonist of the caste based society are empowered with powerful tricks to maintaining their status quo. I would request you to write more and more about this issue and build a pressure from outside.

sarbeswara sahoo
Orissa, India


The world today
14 Aug 2006

Mr. Suarez del Solar: I empathize with your grief and frustration, but it cannot be lost to us that we are in the middle of an islamic fundamentalist attack. As the recent foiled plots in the United Kingdom can attest, the war on our democratic freedom is underway and we must answer the call.

roberto
san antonio, tx


In Support of Our Troops
July 29, 2006

To the Editor

The current issue is one of the best I've seen. I recently read the article "In Support of Our Troops" by Aaron Sussman - a humor piece about horrible war crimes that actually works....quite impressive. Mr. Sussman's caustic wit and fastidiously researched information had a tremendous impact. This is sharp, edgy stuff to say the least - perfectly indicative of InMotion.

Keep up the great work.

Best,
Rick Gervin


What happened to the people of the Mississippi
July 23, 2006

My question to the everyone is what happened to the people of the Mississippi when hurricane Katrina hit there. I myself and two other save a family of seven during the high winds of the storm. What about the barge that landed on an apartment complex? Whole city and townships lost. What about the people that were trapped there? Can someone tell me why all the focus is on what happen in New Orleans when we were destroyed the SAME day New Orleans was.

Calvin Thomas
Raleigh, North Carolina


Appreciation
July 22, 2006

Dear Editor,

Am so greatful for such educative writings that build up one's personality. Such will help many improve on their careers in this world.

kiggundu zaharah faridah
Kampala
Uganda


The Segregation of Black Boys into Special Education: My First Hand Experience in Indiana
July 12, 2006

I would like to know why Brenda Stewart and the editor once again seek to place the problems of young black boys at the feet of the "white school oficials". It is not a matter of an "egregious and racist policy" but one of careless, non-nuturing, apathetic parenting. The children are obiviously born with the same ability to learn as non-black children, yet at some point, the culture displyed by the parents and the media portrayal of what young black men should aspire to takes over. Maybe it would be better to contact the producers at BET and ask them why they continue to host programming consistant the bad ideals being set forth instead of showing the positive face of the black community. Instead, Brenda takes the low road and attacks the easy target. While I agree that "our Black Boys are under attack", it is not the "the white man's new slave plantation", but ourselves. The points she makes about teaching the boys to "show respect and love for each other" and explaining to them that to be "smart, respectful, and kind" is a good purpose in life is certainly on the right track, but to teach them that they are the "targets" of white society is tantamount to Hitler's advice to the German people about the Jews. It ability to change the legacy of black boys resides in the homes of the black community, not in the schools.

Richard Sullivan
Virginia


The Segregation of Black Boys into Special Education: My First Hand Experience in Indiana
June 15, 2006

Dear Editor, I wanted to write this message for all the Sisters that are trying to raise Black Boys. As a mother who has dealt with the public school system I must warn all sisters to take control of your sons. Too many of our sons are being placed into special education that serves as the white man's new slave plantation. We must stop this egregious and racist policy that is going on in the US public school systems all across this country. Sisters, we must stop the genocide that is taking place right in front of us. I have done a great deal of research on this issue. The labeling of our boys as mentally retarded, emotionally defected, and behavior challenged has resulted in the disproportionality of our sons being placed in special education and eventually to be railroaded into the criminal justice system by white school officials.

How do we stop this trend: First we have to unite as sisters all across this country to stop the disparate treatment of our sons. Second we need to arm ourselves with knowledge. Third we need to prepare our sons on how to deal with discrimination. Fourth, we need to empower the mind, read every thing you can get your hands on. "Knowledge is Power". Fifth ask for help from other sisters who may be going through the same thing. Sixth, we must respect ourselves and to teach our boys how to show respect and love for each other. Seventh, we must explain to our sons that to be smart, respectful, and kind is your purpose in life. If we are to save our legacy, it is imperative that we began to understand that our Black Boys are under attack. We must realize what we have to do as mothers if we are to turn this around. The other thing that I want to comment on, throughout history the Black man has always been the target. We are in such a crisis in this day in time that the Black man needs the sister more than ever before. As a people, we must began the healing process, it is necessary that we begin that process by loving each other, respecting and having compassion for one another.

For all the Sister's out there I would like to suggest to you the book entitled "Kill Them Before They Grow" The Misdiagnosis of Black Boys in America's Classroom by Michael Porter, he is an Educational Consultant, this brother tells it like it is.

I look forward to hearing from the Sister's who have this conscience state of mind.

Peace & Blessings
Sincerely,
Brenda Stewart
Mother & Advocate for Black Boys

P.S for all the Brothers out there that are already taking a stand on this critical issue walk with us in unity. Education is a civil right!



a piece of my mind
June 15, 2006

Hello editor,
I am writing this letter on regards to this website. i think it is a very resourceful website for someone like me whom is doing debates on affirmative action. I want to thank you for having posted this website. Thanks a bunch.
Lanene
Montclair, California




Black Academic Performance article by Dr. Noguera
31 May 2006

I will read this article again and again to examine closely its assumptions and logic. It discusses some rather relevant areas of black academic performance but I am not sure that the discussion has not avoided some important issues also. I do like the article though, in case you would think otherwise, only that I feel that such matters deserve the most penetrating examination.
Ronald Lewis
Dallas, Texas




Bones of the Homeless
30 May 2006

Hello,
I would like to share photos of the homeless I took and put on a website. It is simply my small way to open hearts to the rapidly growing number of people dying on streets all over our earth.
http://www.bonesofthehomeless.com

Blessings, light and much loving peace,
judy jones
san francisco




Mexican immigrants
21 May 2006

This will seem laughable considering the current political climate in the u.s., but, hypothetically speaking, might not the u.s. solve the entire border/immigration problem by imposing socio-economic and overall human rights demands on the mexican government for its own people? Possibly on a similar basis as the general notion of waging war for democracy?
michael r. Donohoe
albuquerque, new mexico



new orleans
15 May 2006

please check out this web site it is to men from new orleans putting out and dvd on there city it seems to be the real story of new orleans both before and after the hurricane
www.d-americanzdream.com
new orleans, Louisiana



kids not allowed to the prom because of immigration protest?
5 Apr 2006

How can they do this? this is inhumane, it is at least the most prejudice statement they have made, how can we stand and let this happen, not only as latinos but as humans with some type of desency, why are we not crying out and making our voices heard? we need to let these people know that what they are doing is moraly wrong, we latinos are coming to this country to work and make a better life for ourselves but for them the deny these kids of an education and to deprive them of one of the most important moment of their lives? this country does gain from us coming here and taking the jobs nobody else is willing to do, we put out lives on hold and hide, working so that our children can have a better life, can you or anyone blame us for wanting the best for our kids and find work where is available? do they know the mayor percentage of ilegal immigrants who work here pay state and federal taxes and social security including unemployment? money the will never get back? The time is now to claim HUMAN RIGHTS!!! for our people and anyone who comes to this country looking for work, Is is not right that this country was discovered (stolen) from the real american indians this also include the latinos, these country was built from immigrants, where do they get of acting allmighty, against immigration? I was brought here by my parent when I was only 10 years old and had no choice in the matter, now I'm 44 yrs old have two young kids 13 and 14 what should I do now? take them with me back to mexico a place I don't know now, and my kids don't speak spanish, my kids will now have to pay for this inhumane bunch, a lot of us are here not by choice but by circumstances, maybe they should build a wall and send us all back to our own countries not only latins but anyone who is not 100% american, who then will stay behind? not many! THIS COUNTRY CAN NOT SURVIVE WITHOUT IMMIGRANTS DOING THE DIRTY JOBS, WHY NOT SHOW US AND OUR CHILDREN THE DIGNITY AND HUMANITY WE DESERVE
M. Rodriguez
san marcos, ca




Girls getting medicine to stunt your growth
29 Mar 2006

Dear Editor:
I am 17 years old and i am also just about six feet tall, i think it is appalling that they are giving girls medicine to stunt their growth for something as superficial as worry about getting boyfriends. its their personality that should be the main attraction and if they like that than height shouldnt be an issue. And also it worries me that these girls are so worried about getting tall because they couldnt be a ballerina if they were tall, they should still be able to chose an occupation according to who they are not their height sure it plays a factor but i dont believe that we should totally alter our bodies to be able to get a dream profession, make dreams that you can do and be around what you are and not change what and who you are, i believe its ridiculious. I believe that this world is becoming so consumed with their appearance and finding ways to change it that we arent grasping who we are and who we could be because it might be uncomfterable, embrace the the hardtimes and make them work for you.

I am a very tall girl and yes it has been really hard, but i wouldn't trade who i am for anything. I am who i am and i am thankful for my chance to be tall. I date, many taller than me and also many shorter than me it doesnt matter if we are different heights we are who we are and we just accept it. Life comes with its challenges and if you are blessed with being tall they should be thankful and not try to change it.

Thank you for taking your time to listen to a girl who loves to be tall, and use this message as you will.

Sincerely,
S.K.A.




abre los ojos de tu corazon
25 Mar 2006

para todos aquellos que ven a los imigrantes con ojos de repulsion. yo llegue a este pais despues de que en mi trabajo en Mexico nos asaltaron, yo queria huir, ponerme a salvo por un tiempo, y mi intencion nunca fue quedarme, luego el destino decidio que yo conociera aqui al hombre que seria mi esposo, cave mensionar que yo no entre ilegalmente. hace ya casi 5 años que no voy para mi pais y no he visto a mi mam· ni a mis hermanosen todo ese tiempo por razones de trabajo y ahora por razones que no son muy justas para mi. ya hace casi un año que envie a imigracion un formulario para remover las condiciones de mi tarjeta de recidente y durante ese tiempo no he podido trabajar pues no tengo manera de demostrar mi condicion en este pais. no he recibido ninguna carta por parte de imigracion y no me han querido dar una extencion de mi residencia ni siquiera un papel que me permita trabajar para poder salir adelante, tengo una niña de 2 años y hay veces que tengo que pedir prestado para comprarle pañales, mi esposo tiene ataques de panico y anciedad, este bajo medicamento y tambien para eso tenemos que pedir prestado. tenemos deudas que no podemos cubrir pues el sueldo de mi esposo alcanza solo para el alquiler del departamento y para lo necesario en comida. yo he caido en una deprecion muy fuerte pues no me cabe en mi cabeza que el pais de las oportunidades me ha dado la espalda sin darse cuenta, yo sueño con ver a mi mam· otra vez y que conosca a su nieta. este sufrimiento que tengo todavia me alcanza para regalarte una sonrisa, yo se que si me vez en la calle nunca podrias imaginar que mi corazon se encuentra destrosado.

i r
albuquerque, nm




piri thomas
5 Feb 2006

I would like to say that i've read this book when i was 16 yrs old Today i am 46 yrs old and i'm reading your book again. It brought back memories of a lot of things but, this time i'm understanding you more now than before. You see i am too Puerto Rican and i was born and raised in a Brooklyn projects and actually considered myself Black and did most of my friends. But, when it was i don't know i started to think and say wait a minute i'm Puerto Rican got to be me and as i got older i found myself a left the streets alone. I'm proud to say i'm a Newyorican and gay as well and i have to live for me and not for you. Some times i tell my nephew's and neice's be yourself don't be what your not and be true to you. Thank you for a good book 16 yrs ago which is still as hot then still hot Now!

miami, fl



Genetically engineered foods
26 Jan 2006
I just read your article about genetically engineered foods...Wow!!!! Wow!!!! I'm speechless!!!


Auturgy for Eudaimonia
... from privileged trenches ...
Melissa Faye
Published in In Motion Magazine August 2, 2014

The Joy of Float Tube Fishing With Kids
"The float tube is a practical, affordable way
to bring nature into the lives of urban youth"

by Paul Rockwell
Lake Del Valle,
East Bay Regional Parks,
California
Published in In Motion Magazine August 19, 2013


La nueva Ley de Semilla y la matríz productiva agrícola
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Merida, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 30 de noviembre, 2013

El ecosocialismo: retos, rutas y reflexiones
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Barinas, Venezuela

Published in In Motion Magazine - July 22, 2013

Speech Given on the 11th Anniversary
of the War in Afghanistan

Cathy Mendonça
Committee Against Police Brutality
San Diego, California
Published in In Motion Magazine - October 20, 2012

Dreams, Themes and Schemes
The Struggle Over The True Legacy Of Martin King
Part 1 Part 2
by Boyd Lewis
Los Angeles, California
Published in In Motion Magazine September 1, 2011

The Agroecologists Have Spoken
by Miguel Angel Núñez
Oaxtepec, Morelos, Mexico
Published in In Motion Magazine August 23, 2011

Nuclear Power Unnecessary, Costly, and Dangerous
While small family farms can cool the planet and feed the world
by John Kinsman
Near Lime Ridge, Wisconsin
Published in In Motion Magazine August 5, 2011

Response to Michele Bachmann
by Ruby Sales
Atlanta, Georgia
Published in In Motion Magazine July 13, 2011

Reflexiones Sobre La Enfermedad de Nuestro Presidente Chavez

por Miguel Angel Núñez
Caracas, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 13 de julio, 2011

Kaiser and SEIU Flouted NLRB Rules:
An Appeal to Overturn the Kaiser Election
by Steve Early, Ellen David Friedman,
Paul Rockwell, Cal Winslow
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine April 6, 2011

Chavez y Su Nueva Postura Frente a lo Nuclear
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Ciudad Guanare, Estado Portuguesa, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 23 de marzo, 2011

Por Las Nuevas Promesas de Chavez y Nuestra Revolución
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Merida, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 27 de febrero, 2011

Las lluvias y los pasivos ambientales de Agroisleña
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Merida, Venezuela

Publicado en In Motion Magazine 1 de febrero, 2011

The Pentagon and the King Legacy
by William Loren Katz
New York, New York
Published in In Motion Magazine January 18, 2011

Agroisleña Expropriación Ambiental?
Excelente Impulso a la Agroecologia
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Merida, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 17 de octubre, 2010

Venezuela Ecosocialista: un debate pendiente
Prólogo del libro por Miguel Angel Nuñez
por William E. Izarra
Caracas, Venezuela
Published in In Motion Magazine September 18, 2010

"Those Damn Immigrants Again"
by William Loren Katz
New York, New York

Published in In Motion Magazine June 2, 2010

El Mito de la Seguridad y Soberanía Alimentaria en Bolivia

Miguel Angel Crespo
Santa Cruz, Bolivia
Published in In Motion Magazine 7 de mayo, 2010

Las Protestas de Chavez
Golpes de golpes continuan
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Merida, Venezuela
Published in In Motion Magazine 10 de febrero, 2010

The Christmas Eve Freedom Fighters
by William Loren Katz
New York, New York

Published in In Motion Magazine December 23, 2009

Giant Steps: Sister Sonia Joins the Supremes

by Gwendolyn Keita Robinson, Ph.D.,
Chicago, Illinois
Published in In Motion Magazine August 25, 2009

"Being Afghan, a Cultural Inquiry in the United States"
By Hossna Sadat, MA
San Diego, California
Published in In Motion Magazine August 25, 2009

India: Make Hunger History
By Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India
Published in In Motion Magazine July 14, 2009

Declaration of the Organisations
of La Via Campesina of Central America
On activities regarding the situation in Honduras
July 1, 2009
Published in In Motion Magazine July 2, 2009

Smithfield's Cities of Pigs
by Luis Hernández Navarro
Mexico City, Mexico
Published in In Motion Magazine May 23, 2009

Las ciudades de cerdos de Smithfield
por Luis Hernández Navarro
Ciudad de México, México
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 23 de mayo, 2009

Bolivia, el Granero del ALBA:
Exportando Soya Transgénica a los paises pertenecientes al ALBA?
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Merida, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 3 de mayo, 2009

The Militarization of Politics
by Luis Hernández Navarro
Mexico City, Mexico
Published in In Motion Magazine March 30, 2009

La militarización de la política
Luis Hernández Navarro
Ciudad de México, México

"A Nation of Cowards:”
Education and the Perpetuation of Racism
Gilda L. Ochoa
Pomona, California
Published in In Motion Magazine March 1, 2009

Socialismo, Agroecología y Enmienda
Miguel Angel Nuñez
Caracas, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 11 de febrero, 2009

Green Jobs For The Poor:
Obama's New Deal Moment
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine December 21, 2008

The Zapatista Horizon
Luis Hernández Navarro
Mexico City, Mexico

Published in In Motion Magazine December 1, 2008

El horizonte zapatista
Luis Hernández Navarro
Ciudad de México, Mexico


Review of “ New York and Slavery:
Time To Teach the Truth”
by William Loren Katz
New York, New York
Published in In Motion Magazine October 13, 2008

In India, the question to be asked:
“Where Will the Money Come From?”
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India
Published in In Motion Magazine October 12, 2008

On Nuclear Power
Reply to Doug Brugge Nuclear Power Article
by James E. Hopf
San Jose, California
"The huge downsides associated with both fossil and fissile energy sources"
by Doug Brugge
Boston, Massachusetts
Published in In Motion Magazine September 30, 2008

McCain’s Deregulated Chickens
Are Coming Home To Roost
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine September 23, 2008

Global Priority: Feeding Markets, Starving Hungry
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India
Published in In Motion Magazine September 23, 2008

Pink Princess Racism
by Doug Brugge
Boston, Massachusetts
Published in In Motion Magazine September 1, 2008

Welcome Home, Soldier: Now Shut Up
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine August 3, 2008

This Just In
by Arlene Goldbard
Richmond, California

Published in In Motion Magazine July 21, 2008

Nuclear Power's Dirty Secrets
by Doug Brugge
Boston, Massachusetts
Published in In Motion Magazine July 21, 2008

La Agroecología en el Día de la Tierra
22 de abril 2008
Hacia Una Nueva Soberania Agroalimentaria
por Miguel Angel Nuñez
Mérida, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 22 de abril, 2008

Struggling With Class
by Arlene Goldbard
Richmond, California
Published in In Motion Magazine April 20, 2008

When will Affirmative Action, Equity, and Diversity Initiatives as Tools for Social Justice become Unnecessary, Unwarranted, and Anachronistic?”
by Jose J. Soto
Lincoln, Nebraska
Published in In Motion Magazine April 5, 2008

El Susto de Cristina K
La influencia de la Soberanía Agroalimentaria?
by Miguel Angel Núñez
Mérida, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 5 de abril, 2008

Algunas Ideas para el debate
sobre el Desarrollo Rural Sustentable
y la Extensión desde la Agroecologia

por Miguel Angel Nuñez
Merida, Venezuela
Publicado en In Motion Magazine 5 de abril, 2008

One in A Hundred & Twenty in a Hundred
by Arlene Goldbard
Richmond, California

Published in In Motion Magazine March 30, 2008

When Clinton Promoted Outsourcing
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine March 24, 2008

Three Decades of African Popular Theater
by Arlene Goldbard
Richmond, California
Published in In Motion Magazine March 18, 2008

Clinton's Vote Against A Ban On Cluster Bombs
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine March 17, 2008

Never Mind the Voters, Here's the Superdelegates

by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine March 8, 2008

Clinton's Duplicity on Michigan, Florida Delegates
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine March 8, 2008

The Law of Unintended Consequences
by Arlene Goldbard
Richmond, California
Published in In Motion Magazine March 4, 2008

Agro-fuels
A great environmental and social disaster
by Sara Crespo Suárez
Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia

Published in In Motion Magazine January 12, 2008

Agrocombustibles
El Gran Desastre Ambiental y Social
por Sara Crespo Suárez
Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia


Waterboarding and U.S. History
by William Loren Katz
New York, New York
Published in In Motion Magazine November 11, 2007

Documento Base Para La Formacion Agroecologica En La Educacion Superior Latinoamericana Desde La Realidad Venezolana
Un Llamado Al Estudiantado Agricola
by Miguel Angel Núñez
Mérida, Venezuela
Published in In Motion Magazine October 5, 2007

Pay Attention to the Hazards of Uranium Extraction
by Doug Brugge
Boston, Massachusetts
Published in In Motion Magazine September 18, 2007

“Don’t Shop While The Bombs Drop!”
Re-thinking Movement Strategy
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine September 17, 2007

La Reforma Constitucional Venezolana y la Agroecología
Mensaje para la Dra. Cilia Flórez Presidenta de la Asamblea Nacional
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Merida, Venezuela
Published in In Motion Magazine August 23, 2007

La Soya:
PDVSA-Agrícola y Los Empresarios del Sur

Nueva oferta para el Presidente Chavez
por Miguel Angel Núñez
Merida, Venezuela
Published in In Motion Magazine August 23, 2007

Agradecimientos, preocupaciones y sugerencias a la Iniciativa de TCP ALBA
-- Proyecto Soya Bolivia
Santa Cruz, Bolivia
Published in In Motion Magazine August 23, 2007

On the DREAM Act:
An Open Letter to Latino and Latina students
and all leaders of immigrant rights organizations
by Fernando Suarez del Solar
San Diego, California
Published in In Motion Magazine August 22, 2007

Statement on the DREAM Act
by the Association of Raza Educators
Los Angeles, California
Published in In Motion Magazine August 22, 2007

The Real Immigration Debate
Tackle Economic Security, Not Simply Border Security
by Francis Calpotura
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine July 29, 2007

Never Give A Life, Or Take A Life, For A Lie
A Call to American Generals to Respect the Rights of our Troops
by Veterans for Peace and
Asian Pacific Islanders Resist
by Veterans for Peace and
Asian Pacific Islanders Resist
Published in In Motion Magazine July 17, 2007

“Army Of None”
And The Strategy Of Non-Cooperation
Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine June 24, 2007

History Will Vindicate The Courage of Lt. Ehren Watada
Open Letter To General Charles Jacoby, Jr. at Fort Lewis
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


Diversity Must Be An Integral Part of “Who We Are” and “What We Do”
A Commentary on Institutional Diversity Leadership in Higher Education
by Jose J. Soto
Lincoln, Nebraska
Published in In Motion Magazine April 4, 2007

Via Campesina Stand on Agri-Fuels
by MST National Secretariat
São Paulo, Brazil
Published in In Motion Magazine, April 1, 2007

The Trial of Agustin Aguayo
Eyewitness Account
by Fernando Suarez del Solar
English translation by Jorge Mariscal
Würzburg, Germany
Published in In Motion Magazine March 11, 2007

El Juicio de Agustin Aguayo
Fernando Suarez del Solar
Würzburg, Germany
Published in In Motion Magazine March 11, 2007

How Far Is The Venezuelan Revolution Advancing?
59 Points
by Miguel Angel Núñez
Caracas, Venezuela
Published in In Motion Magazine February 18, 2007

Special Economic Zones
Lessons from China
by Bhaskar Goswami
Gurgaon, Haryana, India
Published in In Motion Magazine February 14, 2007

No Immigration Without Emigration
Consequences For The Countries Left Behind
by Norma Linda Ureña
Seattle, Washington
Published in In Motion Magazine, February 7, 2007

Toxic Injustice
"... the military’s use of Agent Orange"
Part 1: What Was Done
Part 2: What Must Be Done
by Aaron Sussman,
Middletown, Connecticut
Published in In Motion Magazine, January 28, 2007

President Hugo Chavez:
And The Rise Of Black Indian Power
By William Loren Katz
New York, New York
Published in In Motion Magazine, December 21, 2006

The New Maharajas of India
by Devinder Sharma and Bhaskar Goswami
New Delhi, India
Published in In Motion Magazine December 18, 2006

¿Venezuela: Paradigma En Toda America Latina?
por Miguel Angel Nuñez
Caracas, Venezuela
Published in In Motion Magazine December 19, 2006

They Hate Our Freedom:
The Truth about the Military Commissions Act

by Aaron Sussman,
Middletown, Connecticut
Published in In Motion Magazine November 8, 2006

On Tsunami Relief and Rehabilitation Work:
Weakening Civil Society
by L.A. Samy
Renganathapuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Published in In Motion Magazine October 3, 2006

Cuba's Latin American School of Medical Sciences
Reaching Out To Us Even When No One Here At Home Will
by Zekita Tucker
St. Louis, Missouri
Published in In Motion Magazine October 1, 2006

Judicial Complicity In U.S. War Crimes
Lt. Watada Case, A Day Of Reckoning For Our Courts
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine September 24, 2006

A Travesty Of Justice:
Stop The Court-Martial Of Lt. Watada
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine September 17, 2006

Globalisation after 9/11
‘Free Trade’ Explosion
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India

Published in In Motion Magazine September 17, 2006

The World Today
“… resist these attacks”
El Mundo Hoy
“… resistir a estos envates”
Fernando Suarez del Solar
Translated by Linda Kraus
San Diego, California
Published in In Motion Magazine August 5, 2006

Philanthropy in the 21st Century Undermining Labor Unions
by Seth Sandronsky
Sacramento, California

Published in In Motion Magazine July 28, 2006

WTO: Doha Destructive Round
Time to Pull Down Shutters
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India

Published in In Motion Magazine July 25, 2006

I've Had Enough of Haditha
Time to Shut Up and Support the Troops
by Aaron Sussman,
Middletown, Connecticut
Published in In Motion Magazine June 30, 2006


We Weep for the Generations Lost
An Inspirational Vitamin
by Shani K. Collins
Atlanta, Georgia
Published in In Motion Magazine June 25, 2006


The Impact of Loss of Academic Enrichment Programs
by Doug Brugge
Boston, Massachusetts
Published in In Motion Magazine June 4, 2006


A Better World Begins in Oakland
The Aimee Allison Campaign for City Council
by Paul Rockwell

Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine May 23, 2006


You May Face Discrimination
A Chapter From
10 Excellent Reasons Not to Join the Military
by Aimee Allison
Antioch, California
Published in In Motion Magazine May 14, 2006.


One Excellent Reason Not To Join The Military
You May Be Ordered To Kill Civilians
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine April 27, 2006


How GI Resistance Altered The Course Of History:
“Sir, No Sir,” A Timely Film,
Premiers Week of 4/3/2006
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California
Published in In Motion Magazine April 3, 2006.


“The South’s Rebel Without A Pause”
Anne Braden’s Tireless Commitment
by Heather Gray
Atlanta, Georgia
Published in In Motion Magazine March 22, 2006


Indian Villages for Sale
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India

Published in In Motion Magazine March 21, 2006


Flood Relief and Rehabilitation
in Karur District, Tamil Nadu, India
by L.A. Samy
Renganathapuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Published in In Motion Magazine February 12, 2006


When A Marine Speaks Truth To Power:
Why I Stand By My Interview With Sgt. Jimmy Massey
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine January 24, 2006


WTO Hong Kong Ministerial
Much Ado About Nothing
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India

Published in In Motion Magazine January 21, 2006


Embedded Journalism At Its Worst:
(The Ron Harris Smear Campaign Against Marine Sgt. Jimmy Massey)
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine January 10, 2006


How Do We Honor Our Fallen Troops In A Wrongful War?
Cindy Sheehan’s Uplifting And Soulful Book
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine November 24, 2005


La Otra Campaña: Zapatismo en Michoacán
Zapatismo y Reconstrucción de los Pueblos Indígenas
by Bertha Dimas Huacuz
Santa Fe de la Laguna, Michoacán, Mexico

Published in In Motion Magazine December 22, 2005


Woman G.I. Takes Stand Against War:
Katherine Jashinski’s Courage To Resist
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Published in In Motion Magazine November 18, 2005


Recruiting Center Shut Down:
“The Power Of The People Is Now”
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



Hurricane Katrina and the chaos of New Orleans
in her aftermath
by Jose Torres Tama
Baton Rouge, Louisiana



Remembering August 29th Moratorium:
What is Self-Determination?
by Beto Flores
El Sereno, California



Tsunami: NGOs and Civil Society
(A Different Model of Aid)
by L.A. Samy
Renganathapuram, Tamil Nadu, India


The Trial Of Pablo Paredes and
The Constitutional Case For Military Resistance
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


The Business of Hunger
ICT and Millennium Development Goals
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India


Army Reservist Witnesses War Crimes:
New Revelations about Racism in the Military
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



Missouri Farmer Visits Cuba
Bill Christison
Havana, Cuba /
Chillicothe, Missouri


Tenth Anniversary of Operation Gatekeeper
Ni Una Muerte Mas
Roberto Martinez
San Diego, California


Community Building Workshop
by Eloise de Leon
San Diego, California


Beyond Elections:
Dr. King’s Teachings On Strategy And Tactics

by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California

Tsunami Tragedy in Tamil Nadu:
An Appeal For Help To Rehabilitate 2000 Families

An in-depth analysis of the devastation by the Tsunami and the re-building efforts of Tamil Nadu organizations of Dalits, farmers, women, workers, and NGOs
by L.A. Samy
Renganathapuram, Tamil Nadu, India



Tsunami, Mangroves and Market Economy
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India



The Role of Boycotts in the Fight for Peace
Notes on Post-Election Strategy
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



Three Statements by Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr.
on the 2004 Presidential Election
1. Jim Crow Revival
2. Assessing the Poll on Black Voter Sentiment
Issued by the Joint Center on Political Studies
3. Shared Security


Why the phrase "Racial Tension" is Misleading
by Omar Swartz
Denver, Colorado



The Military-Industrial Man
How Local Politics Works in America or a "Duke" in Every District
by Chalmers Johnson
Cardiff, California



Jobs with Justice: Fighting For Our Future
Stewart Acuff
Washington D.C.


Suicides on the Farm:
Green Revolution is Turning Red
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India



Death By Lying: "Military recruiters misled my son, and now he's dead."
Interview with Sue Neiderer
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


Hungry for Trade: Statue of Liberty is Crying
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India



Border Patrol raids strike fear and panic in immigrant communities throughout Southern California
Roberto Martinez
San Diego, California


Organizing for the Right to Unionize
Stewart Acuff
Washington D.C.


Father's Day In War
From Grief To Protest: How Peace Loving Fathers Honor Their Fallen Sons
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


Back From Iraq:
"I Killed Innocent People For Our Government"
Interview with Marine Sergeant Jimmy Massey
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



Agricultural Research: CGIAR Turns to Outsourcing
(Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research)
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India



Democrats Right-Wing Follies
Democrats could take a lesson from history:
When they lean right, they lose
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



For Rice is now Oryza Syngenta!
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India



Standing up for Workers' Rights
Stewart Acuff
Washington D.C.


U.S. War Crimes in Iraq: A Prima Facie Case
Respectfully submitted to the International Criminal Court
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


1. Ever heard of Hood Robin?
2. Agriculture Towards a Grey Revolution
3. Stop the Rot
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India


Partners in Crime:
U.S. Complicity in the War Crimes of Saddam
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


"The sins of the fathers"
(affirmative action in South Africa)
James Bean
Edinburgh, Scotland



Bill Gates' Rescue Package: Flogging a Dead Horse
by Devinder Sharma

New Delhi, India



Shaking Down American Travelers
by Tom Crumpacker
Hollywood, Florida



A Thin Veil of Beauty Shrouds Reality in Rio de Janeiro
by Sam Logan
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil



Cancun Fiasco
WTO: End of the Road?
by Devinder Sharma
New Delhi, India



The California Recall and Proposition 54
Rev. Jesse L. Jackson
Oakland, California



How Bush Betrayed Our Troops
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


Rev. Jackson Appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court to Extend Affirmative Action, Not End It
Rev. Jesse L. Jackson
Chicago, Illinois



No Oil For Blood: A Post-War Boycott In The Making
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



President Bush’s Press Event in the Azores “Fantasy Island”
Rev. Jesse L. Jackson
Chicago, Illinois



Presidential War Is Unconstitutional
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



Why Angry White Guys for Affirmative Action are Marching to the Supreme Court
"There isn't a white judge on today's Court that hasn't benefited from affirmative action"
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



Colin Powell:
A Hawk With Smooth Talons
by Paul Rockwell

A Timely Book: “Target Iraq: What The News Media Didn't Tell You”
A review by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



The New Face of Racism
by Lauren Carter
Plainville, Massachusetts

A Time to Break Silence:
U.S. complicity in Saddam's crimes against humanity
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



When Will We Ever Learn?
Dr. King’s Forgotten Speech on Peace
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


Youth at Risk Programs in America:
The need to Modify Children Services Programs in America
by W.T. Purnell, Jr.



An Open Letter to my Colleagues and other supporters of Affirmative Action
" ... making affirmative action a core value ..."
by Jose J. Soto
Lincoln, Nebraska


Supreme Court should consider lessons from California in review of affirmative action in university admissions
by Andrea Guerrero
San Diego, California


Contours of Ecological Democracy
by L. Antonysamy
Dingidul, Tamil Nadu, India


Labeling Has a Tendency to Stick
by Suzanne L. Shelton
Clinton, North Carolina


Jet Ski Frenzy:
Must Californians leave the Wilderness in Search of Peace and Quiet?
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California


Why Jet Skis Kill
Reckless Endangerment on the Water
by Paul Rockwell
Oakland, California



Black Males and America's Labeling System
by W.T. Purnell, Jr.


Cuba travel restrictions
by Tom Crumpacker
Miami Beach, Florida



We are playing Russian Roulette with our children -- and our future.
(about Ritalin and other drugs)
by Charles Mears


Hogs in the Press
by Loranda J. Daniels-Buoy
Long Pine, Nebraska


Lessons from the Flag Debate and Vote
by C. Liegh McInnis
Jackson, Mississippi


Carrying the Torch
"... and still there is no end to racial discrimination in the workplace"
by Carlean Ponder
Washington, D.C.


Black Males and Special Education
by W.T. Purnell, Jr.


Heeding Dr. King’s Warning:
Don’t Sleep Through the “Revolution”

by Jose J. Soto
Lincoln, Nebraska
Published in In Motion Magazine December 2, 2000


The most compelling reason to vote for Al Gore . . .
by
Tom Hutt
Menasha, Wisconsin


An opinion on the upcoming U.S. presidential election
by Roberto Flores
Los Angeles, California


Nader and Progressives
by Steve Gorin
Canterbury, New Hampshire


Privatizing Social Security: Voodoo 2
by Steve Gorin
Canterbury, New Hampshire


In memoriam: Julius Nyerere
We are poorer for his death, richer for his life.
by Jerry Atkin
Portland, Oregon


Young White Men:
Scared, Entitled, and Cynical - a Deadly Combination

by Paul Kivel
Oakland, California


Me and Rodin
Art is a tool for rescuing the planet ...
Jerry Atkin
Portland, Oregon


Tragic Inequalities
(The Earthquake in Turkey)
Alan Drew
Istanbul, Turkey


Affirmative Action for the Better
by Kevin T. Fowler
Anniston, Alabama


The Vindicated and the Vanquished:
A Jefferson-Hemings Post-Mortem
by Robert Fikes
San Diego, California


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